hermit crab essay | lynsey pfeiffer

A hermit crab essay is when you take elements from other things and put it into the essay, such as the hermit crab moving from shell to shell. Like you give away details and a good description about what the essay is about but you do not actually tell what it is about. You have to be a good enough writer to write like this. It gives solid details away like the hermit crabs hard outside shell but, it does not actually reveal what it is like a hermit crab not showing its actually body. So it is not a normal essay nor is it in normal essay form. If I was writing a hermit crab essay then I would beat around the bush and not actually give away what I was talking about. I would drop good hints and hope that my reader would eventually pick up on them. I would not actually reveal it because as the writer, I am suppose to write well enough that my reader could pick up on my hints and clues as to what I am talking about in my essay. I would slowly reveal hints that would hopefully help the reader guess what was going on in the essay.

Tell It Slant | Student Sample: Hermit Crab Essay

If you’re looking for a unique way to write an essay, to bend the genre, how about writing a Hermit Crab Essay? “This kind of essay appropriates existing forms as an outer covering, to protect its soft, vulnerable underbelly,” and write in their co-authored non-fiction craft book, . The metaphor of the hermit crab is fitting. They are born without shells, and need to find an empty shell in order to protect themselves. As Brenda and Suzanne write in their book, the same goes for “an essay that deals with material that seems born without its own carapace—material that is soft, exposed, and tender, and must look elsewhere to find the form that will contain it.”


Student Sample: Hermit Crab Essay ..

Hermit Crab Essay: Syllabus

If you’re looking for a unique way to write an essay, to bend the genre, how about writing a Hermit Crab Essay? “This kind of essay appropriates existing forms as an outer covering, to protect its soft, vulnerable underbelly,” and write in their co-authored non-fiction craft book, . The metaphor of the hermit crab is fitting. They are born without shells, and need to find an empty shell in order to protect themselves. As Brenda and Suzanne write in their book, the same goes for “an essay that deals with material that seems born without its own carapace—material that is soft, exposed, and tender, and must look elsewhere to find the form that will contain it.”